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image: 2015 Top 10 Innovations

2015 Top 10 Innovations

By | April 13, 2015

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3 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Creativity Crisis</em>

Book Excerpt from The Creativity Crisis

By | January 7, 2015

In Chapter 1, “Yin and Yang,” author Roberta B. Ness explores the dynamic tension between innovation and risk aversion in science past and present.

1 Comment

image: Innovation Renovation

Innovation Renovation

By | January 1, 2015

Is the fear of funding and doing fundamental, risky research killing our ability to make breakthroughs?

3 Comments

image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

1 Comment

image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

0 Comments

image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

2 Comments

image: Bad Raps

Bad Raps

By | December 1, 2014

Understanding animal diseases—for their sake and for ours

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2014

Your Atomic Self, Eureka!, A Talent for Friendship, and Undeniable

0 Comments

image: Desktop Human

Desktop Human

By | December 1, 2014

Meet the researchers behind ATHENA, the project that aims to create a system of linked model human organs that may revolutionize drug development.

0 Comments

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