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image: Homo Minutus

Homo Minutus

By | December 1, 2014

A miniature platform with multiple organ-on-a-chip constructs aims to speed up drug discovery—and create better transplants for patients.

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Honorable Innovation

By | December 1, 2014

Runners up in the Top 10 Innovations of 2014 competition

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image: Microflora for Hire

Microflora for Hire

By | December 1, 2014

The guts of cows and termites harbor microbes that are renowned complex-carbohydrate digesters, but the human gastrointestinal tract has flora that just might measure up.

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image: Polymerase Pieces

Polymerase Pieces

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers discover a new subunit of a bacterial RNA polymerase—as well as hints of its potential role in defending against viruses.

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Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2014

December 2014's selection of notable quotes

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Top 10 Innovations 2014

By | December 1, 2014

The list of the year’s best new products contains both perennial winners and innovative newcomers.

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image: Mosquito Genomes Galore

Mosquito Genomes Galore

By | November 27, 2014

Whole-genome sequences of 16 different mosquito species reveal rapid evolution and could inform malaria research.

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image: Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

By | November 24, 2014

The cold-tolerant cereal crop allowed humans to live and farm higher than ever starting more than 3,000 years ago.

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image: Virus Protects Mouse Gut

Virus Protects Mouse Gut

By | November 19, 2014

A murine norovirus appears to recover some of the functions of commensal bacteria in the guts of germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice.

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image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is associated with sea star wasting disease.

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