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Contributors

By | January 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Inventing Teamwork

By | January 1, 2016

What can social networks among hunter-gatherers in Tanzania teach us about how cooperation evolved in human populations?

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Managing Methylation

By | January 1, 2016

A long noncoding RNA associated with DNA methylation has the power to regulate colon cancer growth in vitro.

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Reveling in the Revealed

By | January 1, 2016

A growing toolbox for surveying the activity of entire genomes

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Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

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Telomerase Overdrive

By | January 1, 2016

Two mutations in a gene involved in telomere extension reverse the gene’s epigenetic silencing.

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To Retain a Brain

By | January 1, 2016

Exceptional neural fossil preservation helps answer questions about ancient arthropod evolution.

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Maintaining Cooperation

By | January 1, 2016

How organisms keep their biological partners from cheating

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RNA Methylation Dynamics

By , , and | January 1, 2016

Additions to the bases of RNA molecules can be written, read, and erased.

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Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.

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