The Scientist

» innovation, genetics & genomics and culture

Most Recent

image: Homo Minutus

Homo Minutus

By | December 1, 2014

A miniature platform with multiple organ-on-a-chip constructs aims to speed up drug discovery—and create better transplants for patients.

1 Comment

image: Honorable Innovation

Honorable Innovation

By | December 1, 2014

Runners up in the Top 10 Innovations of 2014 competition

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2014

December 2014's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Top 10 Innovations 2014

Top 10 Innovations 2014

By | December 1, 2014

The list of the year’s best new products contains both perennial winners and innovative newcomers.

1 Comment

image: Mosquito Genomes Galore

Mosquito Genomes Galore

By | November 27, 2014

Whole-genome sequences of 16 different mosquito species reveal rapid evolution and could inform malaria research.

1 Comment

image: Tapeworm Inhabits Man’s Brain for Years

Tapeworm Inhabits Man’s Brain for Years

By | November 24, 2014

Researchers sequence a rare species of parasitic worm pulled from a patient’s cerebrum, where it was causing seizures, headaches, and flashbacks.

3 Comments

image: Similarities and Differences

Similarities and Differences

By | November 21, 2014

Results from the Mouse ENCODE project point to key divergences in gene regulation architecture compared to humans.

0 Comments

image: Zeroing in on the “Gay Gene”

Zeroing in on the “Gay Gene”

By | November 19, 2014

The largest study yet of the genetic roots of homosexuality links sexual preference in men to two regions of the genome.

7 Comments

image: Species-Specific

Species-Specific

By | November 17, 2014

Scientists uncover striking differences between mouse and human gene expression across a variety of tissues.

10 Comments

image: Culturing Drug-Resistant Tumors

Culturing Drug-Resistant Tumors

By | November 17, 2014

Improved methods to grow patients’ tumor cells in a dish offer opportunities to find durable therapies.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

  4. Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain
AAAS