The Scientist

» reproducibility and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: The Great Big Clean-Up

The Great Big Clean-Up

By | September 1, 2015

From tossing out cross-contaminated cell lines to flagging genomic misnomers, a push is on to tidy up biomedical research.

5 Comments

image: Psychology’s Failure to Replicate

Psychology’s Failure to Replicate

By | August 31, 2015

Researchers react to the finding that most of 100 studies recently analyzed were not reproducible.

2 Comments

image: Q&A: Placental Ponderings

Q&A: Placental Ponderings

By | August 27, 2015

Biologist Christopher Coe answers readers’ questions about the prescient organ.

0 Comments

image: A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

By | August 1, 2015

This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2015 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Leaving an Imprint

Leaving an Imprint

By | August 1, 2015

Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.

1 Comment

image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

0 Comments

image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

0 Comments

image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

1 Comment

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2015

August 2015's selection of notable quotes

5 Comments

Popular Now

  1. What Budget Cuts Might Mean for US Science
    News Analysis What Budget Cuts Might Mean for US Science

    A look at the historical effects of downsized research funding suggests that the Trump administration’s proposed budget could hit early-career scientists the hardest.  

  2. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  3. Opinion: On “The Impact Factor Fallacy”
  4. Unstructured Proteins Help Tardigrades Survive Desiccation
Business Birmingham