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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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image: Qualities Tied to Potential Scientific Bias

Qualities Tied to Potential Scientific Bias

By | March 21, 2017

Overestimation of effect sizes in meta-analyses is linked with early-career status, small collaborations, or misconduct records, according to a study.

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image: Peer Reviewers Less Likely to Be Women

Peer Reviewers Less Likely to Be Women

By | January 26, 2017

An analysis of journals from the American Geophysical Union finds women are underrepresented as reviewers, likely because editors recommend them less often.

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image: Opinion: Fixing Science’s Human Bias

Opinion: Fixing Science’s Human Bias

By and | September 1, 2016

It’s time to accelerate the conversation about why the research community is still not diverse.

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image: The Trouble With Sex in Science

The Trouble With Sex in Science

By | August 9, 2016

Researchers argue for the consideration of hormones and sex chromosomes in preclinical experiments.

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image: Surgery Studies Rarely Use Females

Surgery Studies Rarely Use Females

By | August 28, 2014

An analysis of papers published in several surgical journals reveals an overwhelming reliance on male subjects and male-derived cells.

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image: Exaggeration Nation

Exaggeration Nation

By | August 27, 2013

A new study finds behavioral researchers in the U.S. are prone to reporting extreme results.

3 Comments

image: Lost in Translation

Lost in Translation

By | July 16, 2013

Failure to translate preclinical research to humans may be due in part to biased reporting.

4 Comments

image: NIH Bias Challenged

NIH Bias Challenged

By | February 1, 2013

A new study disputes findings of a 2011 analysis suggesting that black researchers are funded less than their equally qualified white peers.

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image: Stats Are Right Most of the Time

Stats Are Right Most of the Time

By | January 28, 2013

A new analysis suggests that only 14 percent of published biomedical results are wrong, despite prominent opinions to the contrary.

1 Comment

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