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image: Peer Reviewers Less Likely to Be Women

Peer Reviewers Less Likely to Be Women

By | January 26, 2017

An analysis of journals from the American Geophysical Union finds women are underrepresented as reviewers, likely because editors recommend them less often.

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image: Opinion: Fixing Science’s Human Bias

Opinion: Fixing Science’s Human Bias

By and | September 1, 2016

It’s time to accelerate the conversation about why the research community is still not diverse.

3 Comments

image: The Trouble With Sex in Science

The Trouble With Sex in Science

By | August 9, 2016

Researchers argue for the consideration of hormones and sex chromosomes in preclinical experiments.

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image: Surgery Studies Rarely Use Females

Surgery Studies Rarely Use Females

By | August 28, 2014

An analysis of papers published in several surgical journals reveals an overwhelming reliance on male subjects and male-derived cells.

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image: Exaggeration Nation

Exaggeration Nation

By | August 27, 2013

A new study finds behavioral researchers in the U.S. are prone to reporting extreme results.

3 Comments

image: Lost in Translation

Lost in Translation

By | July 16, 2013

Failure to translate preclinical research to humans may be due in part to biased reporting.

4 Comments

image: NIH Bias Challenged

NIH Bias Challenged

By | February 1, 2013

A new study disputes findings of a 2011 analysis suggesting that black researchers are funded less than their equally qualified white peers.

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image: Stats Are Right Most of the Time

Stats Are Right Most of the Time

By | January 28, 2013

A new analysis suggests that only 14 percent of published biomedical results are wrong, despite prominent opinions to the contrary.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: The Successes of Women in STEM

Opinion: The Successes of Women in STEM

By | January 23, 2013

Women have come a long way, but roadblocks remain

1 Comment

image: Spinning Clinical Trials

Spinning Clinical Trials

By | January 16, 2013

Results of breast cancer drug trials are regularly spun to conceal bias and make the drugs seem more effective or less toxic than they really are.

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