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image: Q&A: Placental Ponderings

Q&A: Placental Ponderings

By | August 27, 2015

Biologist Christopher Coe answers readers’ questions about the prescient organ.

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image: Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

By | August 26, 2015

The fungal and bacterial communities in household dust can reveal some details about a building’s inhabitants.

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image: Bacteria to Blame?

Bacteria to Blame?

By | August 18, 2015

T cells activated in the microbe-dense gut can spark an autoimmune eye disease, a study shows. 

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image: The Search for Persisters

The Search for Persisters

By | August 11, 2015

Lyme disease–causing bacteria can outmaneuver antibiotics in vitro and manipulate the mouse immune system.

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image: Subway Microbiome Study Revised

Subway Microbiome Study Revised

By | August 4, 2015

Researchers tone down their highly publicized study that reported the presence of deadly pathogens on New York City subways.

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image: A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

By | August 1, 2015

This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Leaving an Imprint

Leaving an Imprint

By | August 1, 2015

Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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