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The Scientist

» developmental biology and microbiology

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image: Arsenic-based Life Challenged Again

Arsenic-based Life Challenged Again

By | January 24, 2012

An attempt to regrow the infamous GFAJ-1 bacteria, reported to incorporate arsenic into its DNA backbone, has failed.

9 Comments

image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

9 Comments

image: Top Ten Innovations 2011

Top Ten Innovations 2011

By | January 1, 2012

Our list of the best and brightest products that 2011 had to offer the life scientist

5 Comments

image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

3 Comments

image: Arsenic Bug's Genome Sequenced

Arsenic Bug's Genome Sequenced

By | December 7, 2011

Researchers have mapped out the DNA of what some scientists claim to be an arsenic loving bacterium.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cells Traced To Heart

Stem Cells Traced To Heart

By | December 1, 2011

New research suggests that a controversial class of stem cells originates in the heart and retains some ability to repair damaged tissue.

3 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.

3 Comments

image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42

5 Comments

image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 

3 Comments

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