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image: Study: Short Headlines Get More Citations

Study: Short Headlines Get More Citations

By | August 27, 2015

Scientific journals that publish papers with snappier titles accrue more citations per paper, according to a report.

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image: Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down

Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down

By | August 24, 2015

Academic research could be strengthened by thinking more and doing less.

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image: A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

By | August 1, 2015

This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Life on the Edge</em>

Book Excerpt from Life on the Edge

By | August 1, 2015

In Chapter 4, “The quantum beat,” authors Johnjoe McFadden and Jim Al-Khalili rethink Newton’s apple from a quantum-biological perspective.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2015

Gods of the Morning, Hedonic Eating, A Beautiful Question, and Genomic Messages

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Good Vibrations

Good Vibrations

By | August 1, 2015

Does a delicately orchestrated balance between quantum and classical physics distinguish living from nonliving things?

15 Comments

image: Leaving an Imprint

Leaving an Imprint

By | August 1, 2015

Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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