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image: Synchronized Clocks

Synchronized Clocks

By | May 16, 2012

Researchers identify the first circadian clock component conserved across all three domains of life.

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image: Gene Signaling by Remote

Gene Signaling by Remote

By | May 7, 2012

Nanoparticles in mice can be switched on to activate insulin production using a radio signal.

0 Comments

image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Six Threats to Chromosomes

Six Threats to Chromosomes

By | May 3, 2012

Researchers identify two new DNA repair systems, in addition to four that were already known, that can attack unprotected telomeres.

5 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

image: Nervous Mice Get Worse Cancer

Nervous Mice Get Worse Cancer

By | May 3, 2012

Anxious mice are more likely to come down with aggressive skin cancer than those who show less stress on behavioral tests.

0 Comments

image: Telomere Basics

Telomere Basics

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. 

4 Comments

image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

2 Comments

image: Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

By | May 1, 2012

From accounts of deformed animals to scratch-and-sniff technology, Robert Boyle's early contributions to the Royal Society of London were prolific and wide ranging.

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image: Telomeres in Disease

Telomeres in Disease

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres have been linked to numerous diseases over the years, but how exactly short telomeres cause diseases and how medicine can prevent telomere erosion are still up for debate.

16 Comments

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