The Scientist

» developmental biology, ecology and culture

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Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2016

May 2016's selection of notable quotes

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The Global Science Era

By | May 1, 2016

As international collaboration becomes increasingly common, researchers must work to limit their own biases and let cultural diversity enhance their work.

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image: The Zombie Literature

The Zombie Literature

By | May 1, 2016

Retractions are on the rise. But reams of flawed research papers persist in the scientific literature. Is it time to change the way papers are published?

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image: To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

By | May 1, 2016

The study of nonhuman intelligence is coming into its own as researchers realize the unique contexts in which distinct species learn and behave.

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image: Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

By | April 28, 2016

Baby fish show fewer signs of stress in the presence of large fish that scare off midsize predators. 

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A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2016

Lab Girl, The Most Perfect Thing, Half-Earth, and Cosmosapiens

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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