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image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

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image: Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

By | October 20, 2013

An immune suppressive drug can unexpectedly help immunized mice fight off many strains of flu.

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image: Next Generation: Cells Communicate with Light

Next Generation: Cells Communicate with Light

By | October 20, 2013

Researchers design a clear cellular scaffold called a hydrogel that can be used to detect and transmit light to cells in vivo.

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image: Get a Whiff of This

Get a Whiff of This

By | October 1, 2013

An issue devoted to the latest research on how smells lead to actions

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image: Scents in a Flash

Scents in a Flash

By | October 1, 2013

The modern technique of optogenetics stimulates the complex act of smelling with a simple flash of light.

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image: Brain Circuit Toggles Eating

Brain Circuit Toggles Eating

By | September 26, 2013

A network of neurons in the hypothalamus can turn feeding behavior on or off with the flip of an optogenetic switch in mice.  

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image: Manipulating Mouse Memory

Manipulating Mouse Memory

By | July 25, 2013

Researchers deliver bursts of light to specific cells in the mouse hippocampus to implant false memories about a fearful event.

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image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

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image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.

3 Comments

image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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