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image: All Systems Go

All Systems Go

By | December 1, 2014

Alan Aderem earned his PhD while under house arrest for protesting apartheid in South Africa. His early political involvement has guided his scientific focus, encouraging fellow systems biologists to study immunology and infectious diseases.

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image: Bespoke Cell Jackets

Bespoke Cell Jackets

By | December 1, 2014

Scientists make hydrogel coats for individual cells that can be tailored to specific research questions.

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image: Cutting the Wire

Cutting the Wire

By | December 1, 2014

Optical techniques for monitoring action potentials

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image: Viviana Gradinaru: Clearing the Way

Viviana Gradinaru: Clearing the Way

By | December 1, 2014

Assistant Professor, Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Caltech. Age: 33

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse, November 14

The Scientist on The Pulse, November 14

By | November 14, 2014

Mounting and drilling a comet, mind-controlled gene expression, and dissecting cat genomes

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image: Mind-Controlled Gene Expression

Mind-Controlled Gene Expression

By | November 11, 2014

A light-inducible optogenetic implant in mice, powered by EEG, responds to a human participant’s mental state.

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: Light-Activated Memory Switch

Light-Activated Memory Switch

By | August 27, 2014

Scientists use optogenetics to swap out negative memories for positive ones—and vice versa—in mice.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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