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» optogenetics and culture

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image: Cutting the Wire

Cutting the Wire

By | December 1, 2014

Optical techniques for monitoring action potentials

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image: Viviana Gradinaru: Clearing the Way

Viviana Gradinaru: Clearing the Way

By | December 1, 2014

Assistant Professor, Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Caltech. Age: 33

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image: Culturing Drug-Resistant Tumors

Culturing Drug-Resistant Tumors

By | November 17, 2014

Improved methods to grow patients’ tumor cells in a dish offer opportunities to find durable therapies.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse, November 14

The Scientist on The Pulse, November 14

By | November 14, 2014

Mounting and drilling a comet, mind-controlled gene expression, and dissecting cat genomes

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image: Mind-Controlled Gene Expression

Mind-Controlled Gene Expression

By | November 11, 2014

A light-inducible optogenetic implant in mice, powered by EEG, responds to a human participant’s mental state.

2 Comments

image: The End of Science Sexism?

The End of Science Sexism?

By | November 5, 2014

A study suggests that, at least in US academia, men and women now receive roughly equivalent treatment in the workplace. The scientific community disagrees.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Walking Whales</em>

Book Excerpt from The Walking Whales

By | November 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “Fossils and War,” author J.G.M. “Hans” Thewissen describes the difficulties of conducting field research in a conflict zone.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2014

Leonardo's Brain, The Future of the Brain, Dodging Extinction, and Arrival of the Fittest

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image: The Rules of Replication

The Rules of Replication

By | November 1, 2014

Should there be standard protocols for how researchers attempt to reproduce the work of others?

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image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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