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image: Complications of Brain Manipulations

Complications of Brain Manipulations

By | December 9, 2015

The complex connectivities of mammalian and avian brains can confound the outcomes of transient neural manipulations, researchers show.

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Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

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image: Life Scientists Honored

Life Scientists Honored

By | November 9, 2015

Breakthrough Prizes of $3 million each go to five researchers in the life sciences, recognizing their pioneering work in optogenetics, disease-associated mutation analyses, and ancient DNA sequencing.

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image: Following the Funding

Following the Funding

By | November 4, 2015

Researchers use network theory to estimate the importance of relationships among researchers and institutions in attracting grant money.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

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Remote Mind Control

By | November 1, 2015

Using chemogenetic tools to spur the brain into action

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image: 2015 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2015 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By and | November 1, 2015

This year’s survey highlights dramatic regional, sector, and gender variations.

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image: Electrode-Free Electrophysiology

Electrode-Free Electrophysiology

By | October 22, 2015

Optogenetics has evolved beyond its neuron-stimulating capacities to an all-optical approach for both manipulating and recording cells.

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