The Scientist

» optogenetics and developmental biology

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image: Turning Off Hunger Pangs

Turning Off Hunger Pangs

By | April 27, 2015

Researchers identify a neural circuit that controls feelings of fullness in mice.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

By | March 12, 2015

Researchers develop a technique to trigger neural activity in culture using light to heat gold nanoparticles.

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image: Notable Young Neuroscientist Dies

Notable Young Neuroscientist Dies

By | February 18, 2015

Xu Liu, who used optogenetics to manipulate memories in mice, has passed away at age 37.

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image: Optogenetics Pioneer Honored

Optogenetics Pioneer Honored

By | February 10, 2015

The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health names Karl Deisseroth the winner of the 2015 Lurie Prize in Biomedical Sciences.

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image: Brain Cells Behind Overeating

Brain Cells Behind Overeating

By | January 29, 2015

Scientists have defined mouse neurons responsible for excessive food consumption at an unprecedented level of detail. 

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image: Thirst Neurons Found

Thirst Neurons Found

By | January 26, 2015

Using optogenetics, researchers pinpoint two distinct groups of brain cells that flip the switch on a mouse’s desire for water.

2 Comments

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