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» optogenetics and ecology

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

By | March 12, 2015

Researchers develop a technique to trigger neural activity in culture using light to heat gold nanoparticles.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Notable Young Neuroscientist Dies

Notable Young Neuroscientist Dies

By | February 18, 2015

Xu Liu, who used optogenetics to manipulate memories in mice, has passed away at age 37.

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image: Optogenetics Pioneer Honored

Optogenetics Pioneer Honored

By | February 10, 2015

The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health names Karl Deisseroth the winner of the 2015 Lurie Prize in Biomedical Sciences.

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image: Brain Cells Behind Overeating

Brain Cells Behind Overeating

By | January 29, 2015

Scientists have defined neurons responsible for excessive food consumption at an unprecedented level of detail. 

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image: Thirst Neurons Found

Thirst Neurons Found

By | January 26, 2015

Using optogenetics, researchers pinpoint two distinct groups of brain cells that flip the switch on a mouse’s desire for water.

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image: May the Best Rodent Win

May the Best Rodent Win

By | January 1, 2015

Are mice, considered by some to be the less intelligent rodent, edging out rats as laboratory models of decision making?

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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