The Scientist

» optogenetics and evolution

Most Recent

image: Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

By | October 5, 2015

Researchers have selectively activated a specific neural pathway to manipulate a primate’s behavior.

0 Comments

image: Closing the Loop

Closing the Loop

By | October 1, 2015

Micromanaging neuronal behavior with optogenetics

0 Comments

image: Holding Neurons Steady

Holding Neurons Steady

By | October 1, 2015

Scientists engineer a feedback loop to fine-tune neuron activity with optogenetics.

0 Comments

image: Negative Thinking

Negative Thinking

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers uncover the first light-controlled negative-ion channels in algae, and they are fast.

0 Comments

image: Polar Dino Discovered

Polar Dino Discovered

By | September 28, 2015

Researchers working in Alaska, above the Arctic Circle, have unearthed the northernmost species of dinosaur ever found.

0 Comments

image: Tree of Life v1.0

Tree of Life v1.0

By | September 22, 2015

Researchers map 2.3 million species in a single phylogeny. 

0 Comments

image: Stimulating Neurons with Sound

Stimulating Neurons with Sound

By | September 15, 2015

Researchers present sonogenetics, a technique to activate select Caenorhabditis elegans neurons with ultrasound waves.

0 Comments

image: New <em>Homo</em> Species Found

New Homo Species Found

By | September 10, 2015

Researchers describe H. naledi, an ancient human ancestor of unknown age that may have buried its dead.

8 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | September 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2015 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

By | September 1, 2015

A new approach shows how both honesty and deception are stable features of noisy communication.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Stroke Alters Gut Microbiome, Impacting Recovery
  2. Next Generation: Nanotube Scaffolds Reconnect Spinal Neurons
  3. Your Office Has a Distinct Microbiome
  4. Will Organs-in-a-Dish Ever Replace Animal Models?
RayBiotech