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image: Primate Brains Made to See Old Objects as New Again

Primate Brains Made to See Old Objects as New Again

By | August 17, 2017

Optogenetic stimulation of the perirhinal cortex can cause macaques to process never-before seen-objects as familiar and known objects as brand new.

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image: Image of the Day: Power Move 

Image of the Day: Power Move 

By | July 25, 2017

When certain neurons in the prefrontal neurons cortex are turned on, mice subjugate their neighbors in a display of power. 

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The Stanford University psychiatrist and neuroscientist known for his contributions to optogenetics and tissue clearing is awarded €4 million by the Fresenius Research Prize.

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image: Toward Treating Alzheimer’s Disease with Brain Waves

Toward Treating Alzheimer’s Disease with Brain Waves

By | December 7, 2016

In a mouse model, researchers mitigated three Alzheimer’s disease–associated symptoms by stimulating gamma waves with light.

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image: Top 10 Innovations 2016

Top 10 Innovations 2016

By | December 1, 2016

This year’s list of winners celebrates both large leaps and small (but important) steps in life science technology.

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image: The History of Optogenetics Revised

The History of Optogenetics Revised

By | September 1, 2016

Credit for the neuroscience technique has largely overlooked the researcher who first demonstrated the method.

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image: Stimulating Novel Neural Circuits in the Mouse Brain

Stimulating Novel Neural Circuits in the Mouse Brain

By | August 11, 2016

With light, researchers can coax a group of neurons in the visual cortices of living mice to fire in concert.

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image: Neurons Compete to Form Memories

Neurons Compete to Form Memories

By | July 21, 2016

The same populations of brain cells encode memories that occur close together in time, according to new research.

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image: Neural Basis of Risk Aversion

Neural Basis of Risk Aversion

By | March 24, 2016

Researchers identify and manipulate a signal in the brains of rats that controls risky behavior.

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image: Things That Go Bump

Things That Go Bump

By | March 1, 2016

Scientists still don’t know why animals sleep or how to define the ubiquitous behavior.

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