The Scientist

» optogenetics

Most Recent

image: Life Scientists Honored

Life Scientists Honored

By | November 9, 2015

Breakthrough Prizes of $3 million each go to five researchers in the life sciences, recognizing their pioneering work in optogenetics, disease-associated mutation analyses, and ancient DNA sequencing.

1 Comment

image: Remote Mind Control

Remote Mind Control

By | November 1, 2015

Using chemogenetic tools to spur the brain into action

0 Comments

image: Electrode-Free Electrophysiology

Electrode-Free Electrophysiology

By | October 22, 2015

Optogenetics has evolved beyond its neuron-stimulating capacities to an all-optical approach for both manipulating and recording cells.

0 Comments

image: Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

By | October 5, 2015

Researchers have selectively activated a specific neural pathway to manipulate a primate’s behavior.

0 Comments

image: Closing the Loop

Closing the Loop

By | October 1, 2015

Micromanaging neuronal behavior with optogenetics

0 Comments

image: Holding Neurons Steady

Holding Neurons Steady

By | October 1, 2015

Scientists engineer a feedback loop to fine-tune neuron activity with optogenetics.

0 Comments

image: Negative Thinking

Negative Thinking

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers uncover the first light-controlled negative-ion channels in algae, and they are fast.

0 Comments

image: Stimulating Neurons with Sound

Stimulating Neurons with Sound

By | September 15, 2015

Researchers present sonogenetics, a technique to activate select Caenorhabditis elegans neurons with ultrasound waves.

0 Comments

image: The Brain on Fear

The Brain on Fear

By | June 25, 2015

Scientists uncover the neurons in the mouse brain responsible for linking the sight of a looming object to scared behavior.

1 Comment

image: Optogenetics Meets CRISPR

Optogenetics Meets CRISPR

By | June 15, 2015

Researchers in Japan have developed a photoactivatable Cas9 nuclease to control CRISPR-based gene editing with the flip of a switch.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS