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image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch


image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.


image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.


image: <em>Drosophila</em>’s New Genes

Drosophila’s New Genes

By | January 23, 2014

An analysis of the transcriptomes of several fruit fly strains reveals dozens of possible de novo genes in each.


image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

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image: Daytime Sleep Alters Human Transcriptome

Daytime Sleep Alters Human Transcriptome

By | January 20, 2014

A mistimed sleep cycle drastically reduces the number of genes that are expressed in a 24-hour rhythm.


image: Dog-Wolf Split

Dog-Wolf Split

By | January 17, 2014

Yet another genetic study of modern canines, both wild and domestic, supports the notion that humans domesticated dogs before growing crops.


image: Common Lab Mice Differ

Common Lab Mice Differ

By | January 8, 2014

Related substrains of the Black 6 lab mouse carry key genetic polymorphisms, including one that has a dramatic effect on the rodents’ responses to cocaine.


image: Recoding Life

Recoding Life

By | January 2, 2014

Rewriting the genetic code can lead to a better understanding of how living cells work, and spawn new biotechnological applications.


image: Genomes Gone Wild

Genomes Gone Wild

By | January 1, 2014

Weird and wonderful, plant DNA is challenging preconceptions about the evolution of life, including our own species.


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