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image: Looking for Latent HIV

Looking for Latent HIV

By | May 1, 2015

Sequencing HIV integration sites suggests that clonally expanded T-cell populations may not be the main source of latent virus.

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image: Soluble Signal

Soluble Signal

By | May 1, 2015

An immune protein previously thought to mark inactive T cells has a free-floating form that correlates with HIV disease progression.

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image: Defeating the Virus

Defeating the Virus

By | May 1, 2015

Recent discoveries are spurring a renaissance in HIV vaccine research and development.

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image: Study Participants Want to Know

Study Participants Want to Know

By | April 29, 2015

Most people who participate in research that involves genetic testing prefer to be told if they have mutations that increase their risk of treatable disease, according to a large survey.

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image: Mosquitoes Play Genetic Favorites

Mosquitoes Play Genetic Favorites

By | April 23, 2015

A twin study suggests that the blood-sucking insects are more attracted to people with certain genes.

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image: Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

By | April 17, 2015

A newly discovered protein promotes immunity to viruses and cancer by triggering the production of cytotoxic T cells.

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image: Gene Linked to Eating Disorders Tested

Gene Linked to Eating Disorders Tested

By | April 9, 2015

Mice lacking a gene implicated in human anorexia and bulimia weigh less than their littermates and display a variety of behavioral disorders.

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image: Studying Ebola Survivors

Studying Ebola Survivors

By | April 6, 2015

A scientist jumps at the chance to study the blood of four Ebola survivors to better understand how the immune system responds to the deadly virus. 

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image: Cancer Immunotherapist

Cancer Immunotherapist

By | April 1, 2015

Scientist to Watch Yvonne Saenger explains recent advances in using biomarkers to identify cancer patients who might benefit most from immunotherapy.

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image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

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