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image: Morphine’s Missing Link Found

Morphine’s Missing Link Found

By | June 29, 2015

Researchers identified the last poppy gene product needed to produce morphine in yeast.

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image: Extra DNA Base Discovered

Extra DNA Base Discovered

By | June 23, 2015

An epigenetic variant of cytosine is stable in the genomes of living mice, suggesting a possible expansion of the DNA alphabet.

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image: Telltale Tusks

Telltale Tusks

By | June 22, 2015

Sequencing DNA from ivory may be useful for tracking down elephant poachers.

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image: Early Code

Early Code

By | June 3, 2015

New research points to key properties of transfer RNA molecules and amino acids that may have supported the origin of life on Earth.

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In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2015

How to Clone a Mammoth, The Upright Thinkers, The Thirteenth Step, and Humankind

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image: Reimagining Humanity

Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.

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While some in the scientific and religious communities have declared an end to the tensions between faith and fact, the conflict continues to have impacts on health, politics, and the environment.

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image: Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

By | May 1, 2015

A close cooperation between science, politics, and economics has helped to control one of history’s most destructive epidemics.  

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2015

The Genealogy of a Gene, On the Move, The Chimp and the River, and Domesticated

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