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image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus

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image: <em>Drosophila</em>’s New Genes

Drosophila’s New Genes

By | January 23, 2014

An analysis of the transcriptomes of several fruit fly strains reveals dozens of possible de novo genes in each.

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image: Daytime Sleep Alters Human Transcriptome

Daytime Sleep Alters Human Transcriptome

By | January 20, 2014

A mistimed sleep cycle drastically reduces the number of genes that are expressed in a 24-hour rhythm.

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image: Dog-Wolf Split

Dog-Wolf Split

By | January 17, 2014

Yet another genetic study of modern canines, both wild and domestic, supports the notion that humans domesticated dogs before growing crops.

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image: Common Lab Mice Differ

Common Lab Mice Differ

By | January 8, 2014

Related substrains of the Black 6 lab mouse carry key genetic polymorphisms, including one that has a dramatic effect on the rodents’ responses to cocaine.

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image: Recoding Life

Recoding Life

By | January 2, 2014

Rewriting the genetic code can lead to a better understanding of how living cells work, and spawn new biotechnological applications.

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image: Bacterial Persisters

Bacterial Persisters

By | January 1, 2014

A bacterial gene shuts down the cell's own protein synthesis, which sends the bacterium into dormancy and allows it to outlast antibiotics.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Genomes Gone Wild

Genomes Gone Wild

By | January 1, 2014

Weird and wonderful, plant DNA is challenging preconceptions about the evolution of life, including our own species.

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image: The Bright Side of Prions

The Bright Side of Prions

By | January 1, 2014

Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.  

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