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image: Lasting Intelligence

Lasting Intelligence

By | January 19, 2012

Genetic differences influence how well people perform on IQ tests as children and senior citizens.

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image: Genetics Pioneer Dies

Genetics Pioneer Dies

By | January 12, 2012

James Crow, who helped shaped public policy over his 70 year career, passed away last week.

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image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

9 Comments

image: Cat Cravings

Cat Cravings

By | January 1, 2012

A mutated feline receptor for sweet tastes explains why cats don’t love sugar but do dig mushrooms.

36 Comments

image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

3 Comments

image: Before the Genes Jumped, 1930s

Before the Genes Jumped, 1930s

By | January 1, 2012

How Nobel Laureate Barbara McClintock nearly gave up genetics for meteorology

12 Comments

image: A Cancer-Heart Disease Link

A Cancer-Heart Disease Link

By | December 22, 2011

Mutations known to increase the risk of developing ovarian and breast cancer may also make carriers susceptible to heart failure.

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image: Video Gamers Help Solve Disease

Video Gamers Help Solve Disease

By | December 20, 2011

The collective intelligence of thousands of video game players is helping researchers understand the regulation of more than 500 different disease genes.

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image: Mom’s Versus Dad’s BRCA

Mom’s Versus Dad’s BRCA

By | December 13, 2011

The age at which BRCA carriers are diagnosed with breast cancer may depend on which parent contributed the mutation.

9 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

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