The Scientist

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By | September 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

Bacteriophages shuttle genes between diverse ecosystems.

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image: Lords of the Fly, circa 1910

Lords of the Fly, circa 1910

By | September 1, 2013

In a cramped lab overflowing with fruit flies, Thomas Hunt Morgan and his protégés made the discoveries that laid the foundations of modern genetics.

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image: Remaking a Classic

Remaking a Classic

By | September 1, 2013

Companies are bursting at the seams with tools to engineer pharma’s next magic bullet: the new and improved antibody.

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image: You Are <em>When</em> You Eat

You Are When You Eat

By | September 1, 2013

Circadian time zones and metabolism

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

6 Comments

image: Single-Gene Knockout Collection Created

Single-Gene Knockout Collection Created

By | August 25, 2013

Researchers develop several thousand haploid human cell lines, each with a different gene mutant.

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image: Gamers to Fight Tree Ailment

Gamers to Fight Tree Ailment

By | August 20, 2013

A new Facebook game called Fraxinus hopes to crowdsource the solution to protecting the common ash tree from a devastating fungus.

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image: Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

By | August 15, 2013

Continuously eating fatty foods perturbs communication between the gut and brain, which in turn perpetuates a bad diet.

8 Comments

image: Cancer-Causing Herbal Remedies

Cancer-Causing Herbal Remedies

By | August 7, 2013

A potent carcinogen lurks within certain traditional Chinese medicines.

15 Comments

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