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The infamous "Baby Louie" embryo is a giant oviraptorosaur fossil from China that resembled a gargantuan bird.

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image: Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

By | May 8, 2017

Bacterial differences after three-month temperature hikes, modeled after global warming predictions, were evident one year later, a study found.

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image: Developer of Amniocentesis Dies

Developer of Amniocentesis Dies

By | May 4, 2017

John Littlefield pioneered the use of the prenatal testing method in diagnosing genetic disorders in the womb.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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image: Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

By | May 1, 2017

Researchers are redesigning the humble brick to produce electricity, to clean water and air, and to harvest valuable compounds.

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image: Learning Your Stripes

Learning Your Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Science’s lowest common denominator has always been patterns.

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The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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By analyzing the genomes of 161 dog breeds, scientists discover how and when certain canine breeds emerged.

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