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» genetics, evolution and neuroscience

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image: Opinion: New Models for ASD

Opinion: New Models for ASD

By | May 14, 2015

The study of mini “brains” in a dish, derived from patient cells, offers a novel approach for autism spectrum disorder research.

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Estimating Epigenetic Mutation Rates

Estimating Epigenetic Mutation Rates

By | May 11, 2015

Generation-spanning maps of Arabidopsis thaliana DNA methylation allow researchers to compute how quickly epigenetic marks appear and disappear in the plant’s genome.

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image: The Rise of Heads

The Rise of Heads

By | May 11, 2015

A 500 million-year-old brain fossil yields clues to the evolution of heads.

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image: Oldest Ancestor of Modern Birds Found

Oldest Ancestor of Modern Birds Found

By | May 6, 2015

Fossils of a new species discovered in China suggest birds developed 6 million years earlier than previously thought.

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image: Mouse Mind Control

Mouse Mind Control

By | May 4, 2015

Researchers use chemicals to manipulate the behavior of mice.

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image: Winged Dino Found?

Winged Dino Found?

By | May 1, 2015

Researchers describe a small species that may have soared through Jurassic skies on membranous wings like those of bats and flying squirrels.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2015

The Genealogy of a Gene, On the Move, The Chimp and the River, and Domesticated

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image: Targeted Information in the Rat Brain

Targeted Information in the Rat Brain

By | April 30, 2015

A study shows that the hippocampus selects which information to send, and where, during different behaviors.

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image: Study Participants Want to Know

Study Participants Want to Know

By | April 29, 2015

Most people who participate in research that involves genetic testing prefer to be told if they have mutations that increase their risk of treatable disease, according to a large survey.

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