The Scientist

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image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: Outsmarting HIV

Outsmarting HIV

By | May 4, 2015

Small molecules that mimic the T-cell surface receptor CD4 could expose the virus to antibody-based immune responses.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Looking for Latent HIV

Looking for Latent HIV

By | May 1, 2015

Sequencing HIV integration sites suggests that clonally expanded T-cell populations may not be the main source of latent virus.

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image: Soluble Signal

Soluble Signal

By | May 1, 2015

An immune protein previously thought to mark inactive T cells has a free-floating form that correlates with HIV disease progression.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

By | April 17, 2015

A newly discovered protein promotes immunity to viruses and cancer by triggering the production of cytotoxic T cells.

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image: Another CAR-T IPO

Another CAR-T IPO

By | April 6, 2015

Cellectis goes public for a whopping $228 million—nearly double the value the company filed for in February.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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