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image: Singularly Alluring

Singularly Alluring

By | June 1, 2014

Microfluidic tools and techniques for investigating cells, one by one

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image: Designer Livestock

Designer Livestock

By | June 1, 2014

New technologies will make it easier to manipulate animal genomes, but food products from genetically engineered animals face a long road to market.

3 Comments

image: Putting Up Resistance

Putting Up Resistance

By | June 1, 2014

Will the public swallow science’s best solution to one of the most dangerous wheat pathogens on the planet?

7 Comments

image: Opinion: GM Salmon: Just the Beginning

Opinion: GM Salmon: Just the Beginning

By | June 1, 2014

Sound risk management concerning genetically engineered food animals is critical. 

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Sizing Up GM Salmon

Opinion: Sizing Up GM Salmon

By | June 1, 2014

On the potential benefits and risks of genetically modified fish entering the marketplace 

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image: Week in Review: May 26–30

Week in Review: May 26–30

By | May 30, 2014

Human proteome cataloged; island-separated crickets evolved silence; molecule shows promise for combatting coronaviruses; study replication etiquette; another call for STAP retraction

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image: Parsing the Penis Microbiome

Parsing the Penis Microbiome

By | May 29, 2014

Circumcision and sexual activity are but two factors that can influence the bacterial communities that inhabit male genitalia.

5 Comments

image: Week in Review: May 19–23

Week in Review: May 19–23

By | May 23, 2014

Sperm-sex–sensing sows; blocking a pain receptor extends lifespan in mice; stop codons can code for amino acids; exploring the tumor exome

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image: When Stop Means Go

When Stop Means Go

By | May 22, 2014

A survey of trillions of base pairs of microbial DNA reveals a considerable degree of stop codon reassignment.

2 Comments

image: Birds of a Genome

Birds of a Genome

By | May 21, 2014

Married couples have more similar DNA than random pairs of people, a study shows.

2 Comments

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