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image: Exploring Emotional Contagion

Exploring Emotional Contagion

By | May 24, 2016

Researchers are beginning to pinpoint the mechanisms by which emotions can be “spread” among people.

1 Comment

image: Scientific Literacy Redefined

Scientific Literacy Redefined

By | February 1, 2016

Researchers could become better at engaging in public discourse by more fully considering the social and cultural contexts of their work.

9 Comments

image: Canadian Gov’t Scientists “Unmuzzled”

Canadian Gov’t Scientists “Unmuzzled”

By | November 8, 2015

The nation’s new leader has appointed cabinet-level science ministers and has removed red tape for researchers wishing to speak with the media.

0 Comments

image: Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

By | September 1, 2015

A new approach shows how both honesty and deception are stable features of noisy communication.

1 Comment

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | February 6, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

0 Comments

image: Chimps Empath-eyes?

Chimps Empath-eyes?

By | August 25, 2014

Chimpanzees may reinforce social bonds by involuntarily mimicking a fellow chimp’s pupil size.

0 Comments

image: Science Speak

Science Speak

By | August 1, 2014

Contests that challenge young scientists to explain their research without jargon are turning science communication into a competitive sport.

0 Comments

image: Scientific Elevator Pitches

Scientific Elevator Pitches

By | August 1, 2014

A number of competitions around the world are challenging young scientists to describe their research in mere minutes.

3 Comments

image: Replication Gone Wrong

Replication Gone Wrong

By | May 29, 2014

Efforts to reproduce an experimental psychology study yield failure, accusations, and ultimately, discourse on how to improve the process.

0 Comments

image: Plant Talk

Plant Talk

By | January 1, 2014

Plants communicate and interact with each other, both aboveground and below, in surprisingly subtle and sophisticated ways.

2 Comments

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