The Scientist

» environment, developmental biology and culture

Most Recent

Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

0 Comments

image: Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

By | August 16, 2016

Exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides is correlated with population declines of a large number of wild bee species, according to a field study conducted in the U.K.

1 Comment

image: Bumblebees Pick Infected Tomato Plants

Bumblebees Pick Infected Tomato Plants

By | August 11, 2016

Tomatoes infected with cucumber mosaic virus lure the pollinators, according to a study.

0 Comments

Science advocacy organizations have drafted a list of 20 questions for Hillary Clinton, Gary Johnson, Jill Stein, and Donald Trump; will post responses as they roll in.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Seven Skeletons</em>

Book Excerpt from Seven Skeletons

By | August 1, 2016

In Chapter 1, “The Old Man of La Chapelle: The Patriarch of Paleo,” author Lydia Pyne explains the public's evolving conception of the first complete Neanderthal skeleton found and described by scientists.

1 Comment

By ditching traditional agar-based media, two biochemists captured iconic images of Myxococcus in 1982.

0 Comments

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | August 1, 2016

Brexit's effect on science, melding disciplines, and more

0 Comments

The same genes can make people more sensitive to their experiences, “for better of for worse,” psychologists argue.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Blood Sugar</em>

Book Excerpt from Blood Sugar

By | July 1, 2016

Author Anthony Ryan Hatch relays his personal experience with metabolic syndrome.

1 Comment

image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR
    The Nutshell Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR

    The US agribusiness secures a global, nonexclusive licensing agreement from the Broad Institute to use the gene-editing technology for agricultural applications.

  2. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  3. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  4. ESP on Trial
    Foundations ESP on Trial

    In the 1930s, parapsychologist Joseph Banks Rhine aimed to use scientific methods to confirm the existence of extrasensory perception, but faced criticisms of dubious analyses and irreproducible results.

RayBiotech