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image: Putting Phytoremediation into Action

Putting Phytoremediation into Action

By and | August 1, 2015

Researchers studying the use of bacteria and plants to remove toxins from the soil must better communicate their results if they want their techniques to be used by practitioners in the field.

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image: GM Mosquito Cuts Wild-Type Numbers

GM Mosquito Cuts Wild-Type Numbers

By | July 21, 2015

Release of a transgenic version of Aedes aegypti, a species that can carry dengue virus, decimated a local population of non-mutated mosquitoes, according to a study.

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image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: EPA Reform Bills Considered

EPA Reform Bills Considered

By | March 5, 2015

If passed, Republican-led efforts to change the US Environmental Protection Agency’s handling of science may never make it past the President’s desk.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

1 Comment

image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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