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image: Tasmanian Devil Cancer Immunotherapy

Tasmanian Devil Cancer Immunotherapy

By | March 13, 2017

Researchers in Australia claim to have successfully used immunotherapy to treat devil facial tumor disease.

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image: Week in Review: August 29–September 2

Week in Review: August 29–September 2

By | September 2, 2016

Roger Tsien dies; the CRISPR patent dispute you’ve never heard of; immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s; Tasmanian devils developing resistance to transmissible cancer

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The marsupials’ genomes show evidence of a rapid evolutionary response to selection imposed by devil facial tumor disease.

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image: Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

By | May 9, 2016

The proteins could be the key to stopping the transmissible facial tumor disease that is threatening the species.

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image: Second Contagious Cancer Found in Tasmanian Devils

Second Contagious Cancer Found in Tasmanian Devils

By | December 29, 2015

A second fatal, transmissible cancer has been identified in the already endangered species.  

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: The Devil’s Details

The Devil’s Details

By | November 1, 2014

With the iconic Australian marsupial carnivore on the brink of extinction, Tasmanian researchers race to unlock the immunological mysteries of a disease threatening the species.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | March 7, 2012

Meet the species whose DNA has recently been sequenced.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | June 28, 2011

Meet the species whose DNA has recently been sequenced.

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