The Scientist

» influenza and developmental biology

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image: Bird Flu Maps

Bird Flu Maps

By | June 19, 2014

Researchers map regions in Asia with the highest risk for transmission of H7N9.


image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.


image: Researchers Question Tamiflu Review

Researchers Question Tamiflu Review

By | April 23, 2014

Critics claim updated analysis of antiviral medication was statistically weak and based on unreliable randomized clinical trial data.


image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

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image: Updated Review: Tamiflu Is a Bust

Updated Review: Tamiflu Is a Bust

By | April 10, 2014

After finally getting their hands on full clinical study reports, independent reviewers say the antiviral drug is ineffective.


image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

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image: Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

By | March 26, 2014

New research suggests that the wooly beasts may have succumbed to a shrinking gene pool or intense environmental pressures as their species went extinct.

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image: <em>BRCA1</em> Linked to Brain Size

BRCA1 Linked to Brain Size

By | March 20, 2014

The breast cancer-associated gene may play a protective role in neural stem cells, a mouse study finds.


image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.



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