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The Scientist

» influenza and ecology

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image: Not Swine Flu

Not Swine Flu

By | February 18, 2014

The strain of influenza that caused the 1918 pandemic probably came from birds, a study shows.

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image: New Bird Flu Threat?

New Bird Flu Threat?

By | February 4, 2014

Chinese officials report the first two human cases of H10N8 avian influenza, one of which is linked to the death of a 73-year-old woman.

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image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus

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image: New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

By | January 21, 2014

A virus that causes blight in plants may contribute the catastrophic decline of honeybee colonies.

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image: Person-to-Person H7N9?

Person-to-Person H7N9?

By | January 20, 2014

The death of a medical worker in China prompts worries that the virus can spread between humans.

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image: Older Trees Grow Faster

Older Trees Grow Faster

By | January 20, 2014

Mature trees soak up more CO2 than younger ones, a study shows, overturning a bit of botanical dogma.

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image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.

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image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.

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image: First North American H5N1 Death

First North American H5N1 Death

By | January 9, 2014

A person in Canada has died of the first confirmed human case of H5N1 avian flu in North America.

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image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.

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