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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

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image: Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

By | March 2, 2016

The genome of a mimivirus strain resistant to a virophage has repeated phage sequences alongside nuclease- and helicase-coding sections.

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image: Getting Animal Research Right

Getting Animal Research Right

By | March 1, 2016

Regulatory and compliance expectations for animal-based research are demanding, while public and political scrutiny of animal research is rising.

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image: Things That Go Bump

Things That Go Bump

By | March 1, 2016

Scientists still don’t know why animals sleep or how to define the ubiquitous behavior.

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image: Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

By | February 25, 2016

Clinical cases link immune changes to a cancer’s spread through the body, but find no role for so-called “driver” mutations.

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image: Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

By | February 25, 2016

The “just right” binding properties of a monoclonal antibody from an Ebolavirus survivor help it neutralize the virus.

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image: Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?

Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?

By | February 24, 2016

Compounds typically used to calm the immune system can prevent death from scorpion venom in mice, researchers report.

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image: Premature Assault?

Premature Assault?

By | February 9, 2016

Plants may trick bacteria into attacking before the microbial population reaches a critical size, allowing the plants to successfully defend the weak invasion.

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image: Embryo Editing Gets Green Light in U.K.

Embryo Editing Gets Green Light in U.K.

By | February 2, 2016

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute in London will use CRISPR/Cas9 to modify genes in early human embryos.

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