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image: Gut Microbes Treat Illness

Gut Microbes Treat Illness

By | July 10, 2013

Oral administration of a cocktail of bacteria derived from the human gut reduces colitis and allergy-invoked diarrhea in mice.

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image: Opinion: Research, Restricted

Opinion: Research, Restricted

By | July 8, 2013

Are the international drug laws the worst impediment to scientific inquiry since the Catholic Church banned the telescope?

4 Comments

image: The Downside of Antibiotics?

The Downside of Antibiotics?

By | July 3, 2013

Bacteria-killing antibiotics might also damage a person’s tissues.

3 Comments

image: U.K. Backs Three-Person IVF

U.K. Backs Three-Person IVF

By | July 1, 2013

The United Kingdom is drawing up draft guidelines for mitochondrial transfer procedures to prevent mothers passing on diseases to their children.  

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2013

Denial, Probably Approximately Correct, Permanent Present Tense, and Against Their Will

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image: Debating Bioethics Openly

Debating Bioethics Openly

By | July 1, 2013

Researchers and bioethicists need to take advantage of events such as the recent publication of the HeLa genome to engage the public on topics of privacy, biobank regulation, and more.

3 Comments

image: Worried Sick

Worried Sick

By | July 1, 2013

Expectations can make you ill. Fear can make you fragile. Understanding the nocebo effect may help prevent this painful phenomenon.

3 Comments

image: Opinion: Unethical Ethics Monitoring

Opinion: Unethical Ethics Monitoring

By | June 25, 2013

Anti-plagiarism service iThenticate breached ethical boundaries in its design and interpretation of a survey of the top ethical concerns among scientific journal editors.

4 Comments

image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.

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image: Genes Get in Your Eye

Genes Get in Your Eye

By | June 12, 2013

Directed evolution of a gene therapy virus vector improves its penetration into the retina.

5 Comments

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