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image: Week in Review, July 1–5

Week in Review, July 1–5

By | July 5, 2013

Fraudulent journal editor?; fat cells detect temp, generate heat; the importance of social media in science communication; functional livers from iPSCs; antibiotics damage mitochondria

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image: Gut Microbes for Life

Gut Microbes for Life

By | July 4, 2013

Most strains of gut microbes stay with us for decades, which may prove useful for tracking our health.

6 Comments

image: Accused “Fraudster” Heads Two Journals

Accused “Fraudster” Heads Two Journals

By | July 2, 2013

A Russian researcher suspected of multiple counts of fakery is chief editor of two scientific publications.

1 Comment

image: Foot Fungus Revealed

Foot Fungus Revealed

By | July 2, 2013

A new study profiles the garden of fungal organism that grows on human feet.

1 Comment

image: Dutch Fraudster Scientist Avoids Jail

Dutch Fraudster Scientist Avoids Jail

By | July 2, 2013

Disgraced social psychologist Diederik Stapel will avoid a trial in Dutch court for fabricating data on dozens of scientific papers.

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image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

image: Image of the Day: <em>E. coli</em> Hunter

Image of the Day: E. coli Hunter

By | June 27, 2013

The Shiga toxin may help E. coli survive predation by the protist Tetrahymena.

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image: Mobile Microscopes

Mobile Microscopes

By | June 1, 2013

Turning cell phones into basic research tools can improve health care in the developing world.

5 Comments

image: Oral History

Oral History

By | June 1, 2013

Researchers use DNA from ancient tooth tartar to chart changes in the bacterial communities that have lived in human mouths for 8,000 years.

1 Comment

image: The Next Big One

The Next Big One

By | June 1, 2013

As new infections surface and spread, science meets the challenges with ingenuity and adaptation.

2 Comments

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