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image: Carry-On Luggage

Carry-On Luggage

By | December 1, 2015

Without a vacuole, cell-cycle progression stalls out in yeast cells.

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Getting Back in Shape

By | December 1, 2015

Contrary to years of research suggesting otherwise, most aggregated proteins regain their shape and functionality following heat shock.

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image: Gia Voeltz: Cellular Cartographer

Gia Voeltz: Cellular Cartographer

By | December 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder. Age: 43

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image: Modern Rehab

Modern Rehab

By | December 1, 2015

See the soldier whose recovery from a debilitating muscle injury was greatly aided by a cellular therapy plus physical therapy.

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Scientific Misconduct: Red Flags

By | December 1, 2015

Warning signs that scandal might be brewing in your lab  

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image: Cellular Rehab

Cellular Rehab

By | December 1, 2015

Physical therapy and exercise are critical to the success of cell therapies approaching the clinic.

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image: BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

By | November 30, 2015

The cancer-related protein BRCA1 is important for learning and memory in mice and is depleted in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, according to a study.

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image: Cortical Census

Cortical Census

By | November 26, 2015

Scientists document the characteristics and connections of mouse neocortical neurons to establish the most detailed microcircuit map to date.

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image: Stem Cell Biologist Dies

Stem Cell Biologist Dies

By | November 23, 2015

Paolo Bianco crusaded against cell therapy fraud and hype.

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image: Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

By | November 16, 2015

In mice lacking intestinal microbiota, white fat turns brown and obesity is prevented.

2 Comments

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