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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

1 Comment

image: Why Older People Get Scammed

Why Older People Get Scammed

By | December 4, 2012

Elderly people are worse at spotting untrustworthy faces, possibly due to decreased activity in the brain region associated with such perceptions.

2 Comments

image: Awarding Science Defense

Awarding Science Defense

By | November 9, 2012

A psychiatrist and a science writer win the first John Maddox Prize for promoting science despite opposition.  

8 Comments

image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

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image: Long and Rocky Roads

Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies

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image: Eggs Trade Genes

Eggs Trade Genes

By | October 24, 2012

Swapping chromosomes from one human egg to another could eliminate mitochondrial DNA mutations that cause disease.

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image: Cloning Biologist Dies

Cloning Biologist Dies

By | October 12, 2012

Keith Campbell, a biologist who was part of the effort to clone Dolly the sheep, has passed away at the age of 58.

1 Comment

image: Scientists Review Own Papers

Scientists Review Own Papers

By | October 3, 2012

In the latest effort to boost publication records, researchers are writing positive peer reviews for their work under other scientists’ names.

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