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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: MIT Lab Retracts Paper

MIT Lab Retracts Paper

By | February 15, 2013

A paper describing a new method for imaging synapse formation has been retracted after it emerged that the first author falsified data to prove its effectiveness.

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image: Physiologist Faked Data

Physiologist Faked Data

By | February 5, 2013

A Case Western Reserve University researcher is found guilty of altering the number of samples and results to inflate the statistical significance of his findings.

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: Researchers Risk Insider Trading

Researchers Risk Insider Trading

By | January 14, 2013

Academics get paid handsome fees to consult with the financial industry, but run the risk of revealing confidential information that leads to illicit gains.

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Why Older People Get Scammed

Why Older People Get Scammed

By | December 4, 2012

Elderly people are worse at spotting untrustworthy faces, possibly due to decreased activity in the brain region associated with such perceptions.

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