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» fraud and developmental biology

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image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

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image: Another Victim of Suspicious Data

Another Victim of Suspicious Data

By | July 13, 2012

The researcher who raised questions about the studies by social psychologist Dirk Smeesters flags dodgy data from another scientist.

2 Comments

image: Misconduct Shakeup

Misconduct Shakeup

By | July 3, 2012

The ongoing saga that led to psychologist Dirk Smeesters’s resignation from the Erasmus University Rotterdam has the scientific community discussing new ways to detect data fraud.

6 Comments

image: Anesthesiologist Fabricates 172 Papers

Anesthesiologist Fabricates 172 Papers

By | July 3, 2012

A researchers in Japan faked patient data on nearly 200 studies over the past 2 decades, according to an investigating committee.

10 Comments

image: All’s Not Fair in Science and Publishing

All’s Not Fair in Science and Publishing

By | July 1, 2012

False credit for scientific discoveries threatens the success and pace of research.

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image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

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image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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image: Sanofi Thief Reprimanded

Sanofi Thief Reprimanded

By | May 8, 2012

A former Sanofi research scientist is sentenced to 18 months in prison for stealing trade secrets.

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image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

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