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August 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Life (Re)Cycle

Life (Re)Cycle

By | August 1, 2012

Death breeds life in the world’s most diverse and abundant group of animals.

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image: A Scientist Emerges

A Scientist Emerges

By | August 1, 2012

At age 16, Alexandra Sourakov has her first scientific publication, on the foraging behavior of butterflies.

3 Comments

image: Microbial Perfume

Microbial Perfume

By | July 23, 2012

Rather than rely on plant-derived products, biotech companies are engineering bacteria and yeast to produce ingredients for fragrances.

4 Comments

image: Another Victim of Suspicious Data

Another Victim of Suspicious Data

By | July 13, 2012

The researcher who raised questions about the studies by social psychologist Dirk Smeesters flags dodgy data from another scientist.

2 Comments

image: Small-Brained Fish Make More Babies

Small-Brained Fish Make More Babies

By | July 12, 2012

Guppies with experimentally shrunken brains produced more offspring than guppies bred for larger noggins, confirming a long suspected tradeoff of bigger brains.

6 Comments

image: Genetic Shift in Salmon

Genetic Shift in Salmon

By | July 12, 2012

A new study finds that an Alaskan population of the fish has quickly evolved in response to warming temperatures.

1 Comment

image: War-born Climate Change

War-born Climate Change

By | July 3, 2012

A nuclear war could have profound effects on crops yields around the world, according to a new study.

2 Comments

image: Misconduct Shakeup

Misconduct Shakeup

By | July 3, 2012

The ongoing saga that led to psychologist Dirk Smeesters’s resignation from the Erasmus University Rotterdam has the scientific community discussing new ways to detect data fraud.

6 Comments

image: Anesthesiologist Fabricates 172 Papers

Anesthesiologist Fabricates 172 Papers

By | July 3, 2012

A researchers in Japan faked patient data on nearly 200 studies over the past 2 decades, according to an investigating committee.

10 Comments

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