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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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image: Stem Cell Biologist Dies

Stem Cell Biologist Dies

By | November 23, 2015

Paolo Bianco crusaded against cell therapy fraud and hype.

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image: Oncologist Found Guilty of Misconduct

Oncologist Found Guilty of Misconduct

By | November 9, 2015

A government investigation concludes that Anil Potti faked data on multiple grants and papers.

3 Comments

image: Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

By | October 29, 2015

The BMJ yanks a study on baby formula from R.K. Chandra decades after it was published.

2 Comments

image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: Two Papers Pulled for Figure Fraud

Two Papers Pulled for Figure Fraud

By | August 17, 2015

A University of Florida investigation has found the lead author on both studies faked data on stress response in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

4 Comments

image: Nutrition Researcher Loses Libel Suit

Nutrition Researcher Loses Libel Suit

By | August 3, 2015

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice rules that the Canadian Broadcasting Company did not commit libel in its documentary series on fraud allegations against Ranjit Chandra.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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