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» hormones and developmental biology

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image: Hairy Situation for Wolves

Hairy Situation for Wolves

By | November 16, 2014

Researchers find high stress hormone levels in the hair of hunted wolves in Northern Canada.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Diabetes “Breakthrough” Breaks Up

Diabetes “Breakthrough” Breaks Up

By | October 27, 2014

A hormone thought to make murine insulin-secreting cells proliferate in mice did not perform in replication studies.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Sari van Anders: Sexy Thoughts, Sexy Data

Sari van Anders: Sexy Thoughts, Sexy Data

By | July 1, 2014

Assistant professor, Psychology and Women’s Studies, University of Michigan. Age: 36

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: Leptin’s Effects

Leptin’s Effects

By | June 2, 2014

The hormone leptin, which signals fullness to animals, acts not only through neurons but through glia, too.

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