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image: “Hunger Hormone” No More?

“Hunger Hormone” No More?

By | April 20, 2016

Ghrelin promotes fat storage not feeding, according to a study.

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image: Newly Discovered Hormone Explains Disease

Newly Discovered Hormone Explains Disease

By | April 15, 2016

Patients with neonatal progeroid syndrome lack a glucose-releasing hormone, while people with insulin resistance have an abundance.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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image: Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

By | February 3, 2016

Signs of getting older are less common among rodents with ramped-up ghrelin production.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Hormone Hangover

Hormone Hangover

By | February 1, 2016

Medication to prevent prematurity in humans harms cognitive flexibility in rats.

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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