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image: BIOMOD

BIOMOD

By | July 1, 2015

Scientist to Watch Shawn Douglas explains the annual competition he established to introduce students to molecular programming.

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image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

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image: Shawn Douglas: DNA Programmer

Shawn Douglas: DNA Programmer

By | July 1, 2015

Assistant professor, Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco. Age: 34

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image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.

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image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

1 Comment

image: The Sum of Our Parts

The Sum of Our Parts

By and | July 1, 2015

Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

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image: Circadian Clock Transplant

Circadian Clock Transplant

By | June 12, 2015

Scientists establish a functional circadian rhythm in bacteria that don’t possess one naturally.

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image: Synthetic Biology Entrepreneur Dies

Synthetic Biology Entrepreneur Dies

By | June 11, 2015

Austen Heinz, who founded Cambrian Genomics to custom print DNA and had grand ideas about designing organisms, has passed away at age 31.

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image: More Lab-Made Nucleotides

More Lab-Made Nucleotides

By | June 8, 2015

Artificial bases that act like the real deal can be designed to bind specifically to tumor cells.

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image: Touchy Feely

Touchy Feely

By | June 1, 2015

Physical contact helps determine who’s present among baboons’ gut bacteria.

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