Advertisement

The Scientist

» synthetic biology and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Week in Review: May 5–9

Week in Review: May 5–9

By | May 9, 2014

Synthetic base pairs replicated in vivo; cardiac stem cells questioned; miniature neurotransmissions and synaptic development; neurogenesis and memory loss; STAP saga continues

0 Comments

image: Augmenting the Genetic Alphabet

Augmenting the Genetic Alphabet

By | May 7, 2014

For the first time, synthetic DNA base pairs are replicated within living bacteria.

0 Comments

image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

2 Comments

image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

0 Comments

image: Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

By | April 24, 2014

A marine cyanobacterium possesses astounding genomic diversity, yet still organizes into distinct subpopulations that have likely persisted for ages.

0 Comments

image: Money Microbiome

Money Microbiome

By | April 24, 2014

Swabbing cash circulating in New York City reveals more than 3,000 different types of bacteria.

2 Comments

image: Microbiome Influences

Microbiome Influences

By | April 22, 2014

Researchers find that gender, education level, and breastfeeding can affect humans’ commensal microbial communities.

2 Comments

image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: March 24–28

Week in Review: March 24–28

By | March 28, 2014

Synthetic yeast chromosome; human enhancers and promoters mapped; brain-wide map links fly behaviors to neurons; treating eye diseases with nanotechnology

0 Comments

image: Synthetic Yeast Chromosome

Synthetic Yeast Chromosome

By | March 27, 2014

A heavily edited version of yeast shows just how flexible eukaryotic chromosomes can be.

3 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Biology Research
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement