The Scientist

» synthetic biology

Most Recent

These engineered “cells” were made from the secretions and membranes of human mesenchymal stem cells.

0 Comments

image: Bacterial Photography Goes Technicolor

Bacterial Photography Goes Technicolor

By | May 22, 2017

Genetically engineered "disco bacteria" sense and respond to different colors of light, creating both stunning art in the culture dish and new possibilities for synthetic biology.

0 Comments

Researchers have constructed prosthetic female reproductive organs and implanted them in mice, some of which conceived and gave birth to live young.

0 Comments

image: Five More Synthetic Yeast Chromosomes Completed

Five More Synthetic Yeast Chromosomes Completed

By | March 9, 2017

Members of the Synthetic Yeast Genome Project have synthesized five additional yeast chromosomes from scratch. 

0 Comments

image: Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

By | February 1, 2017

Nonliving cells developed in the lab can communicate chemically with living bacteria, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

0 Comments

image: Improved Semisynthetic Organism Created

Improved Semisynthetic Organism Created

By | January 23, 2017

Researchers generate an organism that can replicate artificial base pairs indefinitely.

0 Comments

image: Top Technical Advances 2016

Top Technical Advances 2016

By | December 15, 2016

The year’s most impressive achievements include methods to watch translation in cells, trace cell fates, avoid mitochondrial mutations, edit DNA, and build antibiotics from scratch.

0 Comments

image: Synthetic Sensors

Synthetic Sensors

By | December 1, 2016

Engineered circuits detect endogenous transcription factors to drive cellular outputs.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: How to Build a Synthetic Sensor

Infographic: How to Build a Synthetic Sensor

By | December 1, 2016

Scientists designed a genetic sensor-and-readout system, based on detecting a transcription factor, that performs a custom cellular activity.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. So You’ve Been Mistaken as a White Nationalist
  2. Opinion: We Need a Replacement for Beall’s List
  3. Trump Releases Science Spending Priorities for FY2019
  4. Seeding the Gut Microbiome Prevents Sepsis in Infants
AAAS